Banh Mi Bowl with Lemongrass Tofu Meatballs and Sriracha Aioli 

Banh Mi Bowl with Lemongrass Tofu Meatballs and Sriracha Aioli 

This banh mi bowl is the meal in a bowl of your dreams! Top brown rice with lemongrass tofu meatballs, pickled daikon and carrots, tons of fresh herbs, crispy cucumbers and a spicy sriracha aioli drizzle. You'll love all the different flavors and textures! Perfect for meal prep because it's delicious straight out of the refrigerator. 

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Vietnamese Tofu Lettuce Wraps

Vietnamese Tofu Lettuce Wraps

My favorite recipes are ones that are packed with tons of different flavors and textures, and don't take too long to cook! These Vietnamese tofu lettuce wraps meet all those criteria! Tofu gets stir fried with garlic, ginger, peanuts, fish sauce and lime juice and tons of fresh herbs, then served in a fresh, crispy lettuce wraps with rice noodles and dipping sauce! 

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Tropical Tofu Kebabs with Mango and Avocado

Tropical Tofu Kebabs with Mango and Avocado

Heat up the grill to make these tropical tofu kebabs with avocado and mango! They're insanely easy to make, and you can swap in whatever vegetables and fruit you like. Or, instead of this vegan version, make these with chicken, shrimp or pork. 

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Red Curry Tofu and Mushrooms with Cauliflower Rice

This rich and creamy red curry tofu and mushrooms is served over cauliflower rice to soak up all the delicious sauce! 

I mean, would you just look at that.

Seriously, this red curry tofu is everything my body wants right now. We got back from New York City last night and our last 24 hours in the city turned into a bit of a cheese fest. Not cheesy as in tacky in a goofy kind of way, but cheese as in my favorite food. It’s basically all we ate for an entire day. We had cheese stuffed soft pretzels, fried saloumi and cheese croquettes, a bagel piled high with smoked fish and dill cream cheese, late night pizza dolloped with giant scoop of fresh ricotta cheese. We ate dinner at AN ACTUAL CHEESE BAR. Yes, this thing exists outside of heaven and it’s called Murray’s Cheese Café. And because we apparently hadn’t enough dairy, there was a stop at The Big Gay Ice Cream Shop for a soft cone dipped in dark chocolate pretzels and hot fudge. When it’s 107 degrees in a concrete city, you eat and drink your way through in an effort to get out of the sun.

(P.S. People who can fix things in NYC, please take some advice from the south – work on your AC game.)

So yeah, I see a lot of bright, fresh, herby, spicy, vegetable-laden, meatless dishes in my future. Not because I’m trying to detox the cheese out of my system, but because that’s what I want. Intuitive eating is cool like that.

This red curry tofu is a nice transition dish from all the cheese, oddly enough. The coconut milk is fatty and creamy, like cheese. And tofu is basically mozzarella cheese. Seriously. You make tofu the exact same way you make mozzarella, except it’s made from soy milk, not dairy milk.

For veggies, I used a mixture of mushrooms, which soak up the delicious curry sauce. If you can get your hands on a variety of wild mushrooms, that’s definitely what I would recommend. I used shiitakes, which has a chewy texture that makes it my favorite mushroom. I also used cremini mushrooms, which are baby portobellos. I like to have lots of different mushroom flavors and textures going on, so if you can get your hand on oyster mushrooms, enokis, or porcinis, throw them on in too!

I served this over cauliflower rice, which is so much easier now that you can find riced cauliflower at grocery stores. I’ve already admitted to liking cauliflower rice more than actual rice, but remember, it’s still not rice so you need some carbs in your dish. I threw in green peas, a yummy starchy vegetable, but feel free to toss in a can of drained chickpeas as well if you need/want a little more. Or, you know, just serve it with rice.

Red Curry Tofu and Mushrooms with Cauliflower Rice

Serves 4

Ingredients

Cauliflower Rice:

  • 1 tablespoon sunflower, avocado or coconut oil
  • 1/2 onion, peeled and finely chopped
  • 2 garlic cloves, minced
  • 1 lb fresh or frozen rice cauliflower, or 1 lb cauliflower florets and stem pulsed in the food processor to make rice

Curry: 

  • 1 lb firm tofu
  • 1 tablespoon sunflower oil, avocado oil or coconut oil
  • 1/2 onion, peeled and finely chopped
  • 2 garlic cloves, minced
  • 1 tablespoon freshly grated ginger
  • 4 ounces shiitakes, sliced
  • 8 ounces cremini mushrooms, quartered
  • 1 1/4 cup full fat coconut cream
  • 4 teaspoons red curry paste
  • 4 teaspoons fish sauce
  • 1 cup frozen peas, defrosted

For serving: 

  • Lime, sliced
  • Freshly chopped cilantro
  • Red chili flakes

Instructions

  1. Wrap tofu with paper towels. Top with a heavy skillet or can to drain for 15 minutes.
  2. Make rice. Heat oil in a large skillet on medium-high skillet. Add onion and garlic and saute for 3 minutes until translucent. Add cauliflower, season with salt and pepper and saute until tender, about 7-10 minutes. Set aside until ready to use.
  3. While rice is cooking, cut tofu into cubes. Season with salt and pepper. Heat 1 1/2 teaspoons oil in a large sided skillet on medium-high heat. Add tofu and cook until golden. Remove from skillet and set aside.
  4. Ad remaining 1 1/2 teaspoons oil to the skillet where the tofu was cooked and set on medium-high. Add onion and saute until translucent, about 3 minutes. Add garlic, ginger and saute 30 seconds. Add mushrooms, season with salt and pepper and saute until tender, 7 minutes. Add coconut milk, curry paste, and fish sauce. Stir in tofu. Reduce heat and simmer 10 minutes. Pour in peas and cook another minute to warm through. Taste and season with salt and pepper.
  5. Serve over caulilfower rice with lime, cilantro and chili flakes.

Black Garlic Tofu and Mango Spring Rolls with Peanut Dipping Sauce

These vegan black garlic tofu and mango spring rolls are a unique spin on traditional flavors! Serve with a sweet and savory peanut dipping sauce. 

Before we went to Vietnam last year, I had dreams of learning to create authentic versions of all the delicious food we ate on our trip. Then after a street food tour of Hoi An where we learned just how much time and effort went into perfecting each dish, how street food vendors spend their lives cooking the same dish each and every day, passing their secrets down to their children, I realized authenticity was kind of a silly dream. Now when I'm craving Vietnamese, I go to a local Vietnamese run restaurant or if cooking at home, use the recipes as inspiration, not a rule. Kind of like I did with these black garlic tofu and mango spring rolls! Not authentic at all, but SO delicious and packed with summer flavor.

When we were in Vietnam, we sampled dozens of different spring rolls with different types of rice paper wrappers, fillings, and sauces. Also, using rice paper to make rolls out of shrimp pancakes or grilled pork skewers  with herbs at the table was really common. When I spotted these brown rice paper rolls at Earth Fare, on a whim I decided to whip up spring rolls with what I had on hand.

Impulse buy number 2 - black garlic from Trader Joes. It had been sitting in my vegetable basket at least a week or so while I tried to figure out what on earth to make with it. All the recipes I found were a little too chefy for me (black garlic ice cream....errr, no thanks). In the end, I simply blended it up with tamari to make a simple sauce for pan seared tofu.

If you've never tried black garlic before (I hadn't!), it's a typically Asian ingredient made by slowly caramelizing whole heads of garlic over the course of a few weeks. It tastes sweet and just barely garlicky, more like balsamic vinegar or a savory jam to me. If you can't find it, honestly you could just leave it out and swap flavored baked tofu or plain pan seared tofu. While you can taste the rich and savory flavor it lends behind the sweet mango, fresh herbs and peanut sauce, it's not super obvious, so feel free to let those flavors shine.

Rolling spring rolls can be a little tricky, but the good news is they don't have to be pretty, just edible. Rice paper gets soft with just a couple seconds in warm water, no boiling needed. Layer the ingredients in a line down the middle, fold the edges in, then roll. It's kinda like making a mini burrito!

Black Garlic Tofu and Mango Spring Rolls with Peanut Dipping Sauce

Makes 16-20

Ingredients

Black Garlic Tofu:

  • 1 lb block firm tofu
  • 6 peeled black garlic cloves
  • 3 tablespoons soy sauce
  • 2 tablespoons water
  • 1 tablespoon sesame oil

Spring Rolls: 

  • 8 ounce package brown rice paper rolls
  • 8 ounce bag cellophane noodles
  • 2 mangos, peeled and sliced
  • 1 cucumber, seeded and sliced
  • 1 red bell pepper, seeded, stemmed and sliced
  • 1/2 cup lightly packed mint leaves
  • 1 1/2 cups sprouts or microgreens

Dipping Sauce: 

  • 2/3 cup coconut milk
  • 1/3 cup creamy peanut butter
  • 2 tablespoons soy sauce
  • 1 tablespoon chili oil (or 1/2 teaspoon chili flakes)
  • 1 garlic clove, minced

Instructions

  1. Remove block of tofu from container. Wrap with paper towels or a kitchen towel and place on a plate topped with a heavy can to drain for 30 minutes.
  2. While tofu is draining, make the dipping sauce. Blend all ingredients together in a blender or food processor and puree until well combined. Taste and season with salt to taste. Pour out into bowl and clean out blender or food processor to use for making black garlic sauce.
  3. Blend together black garlic, soy sauce and water until pureed. Set aside. Cut the tofu in half through it's widest part, then cut into thin sticks. Heat sesame oil on medium high heat. Add tofu and sear. Flip every 3 minutes until most of the tofu is crispy and lightly browned. Pour in sauce, cook until thick and mostly of the liquid is evaporated, about 1-2 minutes. Remove from pan and set aside until ready to use.
  4. Cook rice vermicelli according to package directions. Using kitchen shears, cut into the noodles making 3-4 cuts so they aren't quite so long.
  5. Arrange the spring roll fillings (tofu, noodles, mango, cucumber, pepper, mint and sprouts for easy assembling.
  6. When ready to assemble, fill a shallow bowl with very warm water. Dip a rice paper roll into the water, pressing gently to submerge until pliable, about 10-20 seconds. Remove, shake off extra water and place on work space. Press 2 mint leaves down the center of the wrapper. Top with 2-3 sticks of tofu. Top with a small handful of rice vermicelli noodles, cucumber, red pepper, mango and sprouts. Be careful not to overstuff. Fold top and bottom edges over the edges of the filling. Carefully wrap one of the edges not covered in filling over the top of the filling, then roll into a roll, pressing in the edges and filling as needed to keep it compact. Set aside and repeat with remaining rice paper rolls and filling.
  7. Serve with peanut sauce for dipping.

You might also like: 

Vegan Vietnamese Brown Rice Noodle Salad
Vegan Vietnamese Brown Rice Noodle Salad
Curry Salmon Noodle Bowl with Soy-Lime Dressing
Curry Salmon Noodle Bowl with Soy-Lime Dressing
Kelp and Zucchini Noodle Salad with Mango and Peanut Sauce
Kelp and Zucchini Noodle Salad with Mango and Peanut Sauce

3 Recipes for Mason Jar Soup

3 Recipes for Mason Jar Soup

These recipes for mason jar soups are perfect for packing for lunch! Batch cook on the weekends, store in the fridge, just add hot water, give it a good shake, and you're good to go! Try Italian zoodle with white beans and tomato broth, red lentil coconut curry and miso noodle. 

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Bulgogi Tofu Meatball Lettuce Wraps

Bulgogi tofu meatball lettuce wraps are a fun vegetarian take on classic Korean food! 

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Hello from Phoenix! Actually, technically speaking this is hello from 30,000 feet above somewhere in Tennessee. We’re visiting Phoenix to watch our Clemson Tigers play in the college football national championships against Alabama. I’m nervous to write anything about the game because this post will live in internet eternity, so no predictions or trash talk from me! Plus, I don’t want to jinx anything, because you know, how well Clemson plays is totally reliant on what some random 31-year-old nutrition grad says ;)

Instead, let’s talk bulgogi, which I don’t think will have any trickle down effects on the championship game. At least I hope not…

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Bulgogi is a Korean barbecue dish, made from thin strips of beef marinated in a mix of soy, brown sugar, sesame oil, Asian pear and gochujang (aka Korean ketchup). Living in the South, there’s passionate debate over where to find the best barbecue. Is it our local mustard based sauce? (Probably). Or is it the thick, sweet ketchup based sauce? (No). Some think it’s the simple vinegar and chili mixture used in North Carolina. (Maybe). We can all agree it’s not that weird mayo based barbecue sauce those crazy people in Alabama like so much. (Okay, maybe a little bit of trash talk ;) )

I might not be let back into South Carolina on Wednesday, but frankly, I think the debate is rather silly, because Asian barbecue wins hands down. Bulgogi is the perfect example with it’s sweet and spicy, complex blend of flavors. South Korea > South Carolina when it comes to barbecue. I am so sorry guys, but it’s the truth. If any of my Columbia friends are mad at me, go eat dinner at Arirang and then tell me how you feel.

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Now, this dish definitely isn’t traditional, but it’s simplified, fun to eat, and still really really tasty. I found this recipe for bulgogi chicken meatballs on Goop that was calling my name. After more meat eating than normal with our recent travels and the holidays, I decided to take a stab at a vegetarian version (p.s. you can make these vegan too!). I remembered my spicy tofu burger from a few years back and realized it would make the perfect base. I actually think I like using this mix in ‘meatball’ form instead of a burger, because you get more crispy crust.

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I served these as lettuce wraps with brown rice, shredded carrots, cucumber, and kimchi, which I forgot to photograph in the rush to catch the last minutes of daylight. Oh my food bloggers readers, you know the joys of winter! If you have some cilantro or basil on hand, I’d throw out a bowl of it too. You could also swap brown rice noodles, or even quinoa. To make these vegan, use chia eggs - 1 tablespoon ground chia with 3 tablespoons water.

Bulgogi Tofu Meatball Lettuce Wraps

Serves 4

Ingredients

Bulgogi Tofu Meatballs:

  • 1/2 cup cashews
  • 16 ounces extra-firm tofu, pressed
  • 1/2 cup whole grain panko breadcrumbs
  • 2 eggs
  • 2 tablespoons soy sauce
  • 1 tablespoon gochujang or sriracha
  • 1 tablespoon sesame oil
  • 1 tablespoon grated fresh ginger
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons brown sugar
  • 1/4 teaspoons salt

Glaze: 

  • 1/4 cup soy sauce
  • 1 1/2 tablespoons brown sugar
  • 2 tablespoons gochujang
  • 1 tablespoon sesame oil

Lettuce Wraps: 

  • 2 cups cooked brown rice
  • 2 scallions, chopped
  • 1 tablespoon sesame seeds
  • 1 head butter lettuce
  • 1 cucumber, julienned or spiralized
  • 2 carrots, shredded
  • Kimchi, for serving
  • Sriracha, for serving

Instructions

  1. Preheat oven to 400 degrees.
  2. In a food processed, blend cashews until finely chopped. Add remaining meatball ingredients, blend until combined, scraping down sides as needed.
  3. Spray a baking sheet lightly with oil. Form small golf ball sized meatballs with the tofu mixture. Mix should make about 20. Spray tops lightly with oil. Place in the oven and bake for 25 minutes until golden, flipping halfway.
  4. While tofu balls are baking, make glaze. Mix soy sauce, brown sugar, gochujang and sesame oil in a small pot. Bring to a simmer and cook until thickened, about 2 minutes.
  5. Drizzle or brush glaze over meatballs. Mix brown rice with scallions and sesame seeds. Serve with lettuce cups, brown rice, cucumber, carrots and kimchi.

Sweet & Spicy Tofu Millet Bowl with Garlicky Kale and Citrus Tahini Sauce

This sweet & spicy tofu millet bowl with garlicky kale and citrus tahini dressing makes a perfect lunch! 

You know what I realized I don't have enough of on this blog? Asian inspired grain bowls.

KIDDING! I've posted 11. Just counted.

Buuuut, I still think this one deserves it's own special place on the blog. First, there's the sweet and spicy baked tofu. Make sure you leave plenty of time for it to marinate, so it soaks up all the delicious flavors. If you think you don't like tofu, trust me, this recipe will change you.

Then there's the garlicky kale. Kale and garlic are like peanut butter and bananas. I love how the sweet bite of sauteed garlic permeates the bitter greens.

Of course, avocado is mandatory. Except when you're about to take photographs and slice one open and it's brown inside. Then said avocado becomes optional.

We can't do a grain bowl without crunch. For this bad boy, we've got toasted pumpkin seeds. If you're ever looking for something to fulfill a salty, crunchy craving, try salted toasted pumpkin seeds. The little pocket of air in the middle expands, giving them some major crunch.

Because all grain bowls need some fermented goodness, I added a scoop of fermented sauerkraut. I used an Asian arame and ginger kraut by Wild Brine but any ol' kraut will do.

Last but not least, there's tahini dressing, the king of all dressings. This one is spiked with miso (more probiotics!), citrus and sriracha.

Enjoy!

Sweet & Spicy Tofu Millet Bowl with Garlicky Kale

Serves 4

Inspired by this recipe in Bowl + Spoon, a beautiful cookbook by the lovely people at The Sprouted Kitchen.

Ingredients

Tofu: 

  • 1 block extra-firm tofu
  • 2 tablespoons turbinado sugar, coconut sugar or brown sugar
  • 3 tablespoons soy sauce
  • 3 tablespoons sriracha
  • 1 1/2 tablespoons apple cider vinegar
  • 1 tablespoon sesame oil

Bowl:

  • 1 tablespoon plus 1 teaspoon olive oil
  • 1 cup millet
  • 4 garlic cloves, thinly sliced
  • 10 ounce bag of chopped kale, or 1 bunch kale, chopped
  • 2 large carrots, shaved into ribbons
  • 1/3 cup pumpkin seeds, toasted
  • 1/2 cup fermented sauerkraut (optional)
  • 1 avocado, sliced

Dressing:

  • 1/2 cup tahini
  • 2 tablespoons miso paste
  • 2 tablespoons honey
  • 1 tablespoon sesame oil
  • 1 tablespoon sriracha
  • 1 tablespoon rice wine vinegar
  • Juice of 1 large naval orange

Instructions

  1. Wrap tofu in a clean dish towel. Place on a plate and weigh with something heavy, like a cast iron skillet. Let sit to drain water about 30 minutes or longer. The longer it sits, the more water it will drain and the more room to soak up marinade. You can leave it in the fridge to drain if desired. Or, you can drain it quickly using a tofu press. Chop into 1 inch cubes.
  2. In a large plastic container, whisk together sugar, soy sauce, sriracha, vinegar and sesame oil. Place tofu inside, cover and shake to combine and coat. Place in the refrigerator and let marinate at least 30 minutes or all day/overnight.
  3. When ready to make bowl, first whisk together all the dressing ingredients. Season with salt and pepper if needed. Set aside until ready to use.
  4. Preheat oven to 475 degrees. Drain tofu and spread evenly on a large baking sheet sprayed with olive oil. Place in oven and bake 20 minutes total, flipping halfway, until browned. Set aside until ready to use.
  5. While tofu is cooking, heat 1 teaspoon olive oil in a small pot. Add millet and toast for a couple minutes. Add 2 cups water, bring to a boil, cover and reduce heat to simmer 15-18 minutes until water is absorbed. Let sit covered a few minutes, then remove lid and fluff millet with a fork.
  6. While millet is cooking, heat olive oil in a large sided pan. Add garlic cloves and saute until fragrant, about 30 seconds. Add kale and 1/2 cup of water. Cook until wilted and tender, about 10-12 minutes total, adding more water as needed. Season with salt and pepper.
  7. Divide millet evenly among four bowls. Top with sauteed kale, tofu, carrots, pumpkin seeds, kraut, avocado and drizzle with dressing.

More Asian-inspired grain bowls: 

Brown Rice Bowl with Five Spice Tempeh and Garlicky Greens
Brown Rice Bowl with Five Spice Tempeh and Garlicky Greens
Sushi Un-Roll with Smoked Salmon and Creamy Sriracha Sauce
Sushi Un-Roll with Smoked Salmon and Creamy Sriracha Sauce
Crispy Kale, Black Rice & Coconut Salad
Crispy Kale, Black Rice & Coconut Salad

Crunchy Asian Edamame Slaw With Baked Tofu

Crunchy Asian Edamame Slaw With Baked Tofu

A recipe for crunchy Asian edamame slaw that's perfect for batch cooking! It's packed with tons of vegetables like radish, cilantro, cabbage, edamame and carrots. Top with baked tofu steaks, seared salmon or marinated tempeh for protein. Perfect with a soy-lime dressing tossed in! Vegan! 

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Tropical Salad with Spicy Mango Macadamia Dressing

Macadamia nut oil is one nutritious oil you should be using! Highlight it's flavor in this tropical salad with mango macadamia dressing.

This month, Recipe Redux falls on Wellness Wednesday, so instead of my usual lengthy ramble on wellness and self care, you're getting a lengthy ramble about food plus a tangent on Jurassic Park and a tasty new recipe. Yay?

April's Recipe Redux theme is all about hidden treasures - those ingredients hiding in the back of your pantry that haven't gotten the love they deserve. So, while I was Spring cleaning my closet (Kidding! My closet is a hot mess.), I did some Spring cleaning in my pantry (Truth. Probably the only clean thing in our house right now).

One ingredient I discovered was an unopened bottle of macadamia nut oil. I received it from my mom, who whenever I see her, always brings a bag of "goodies" for me - a random assortment of things she picks up on sale. On this particular trip, I got an extra-exciting stash - a waffle iron, cast iron skillet, a lifetime supply of gluten free flours, and an assortment of gourmet oils, including this macadamia nut oil.

I made a pretty nice dent into the hazelnut and the avocado oil is long gone. But the macadamia nut remained unopened, sad and alone in the back of my oil and vinegar cabinet, probably because it doesn't exactly lend itself to hearty winter cooking.

Now that the temps are rising, it's the perfect time to whip up a bright and fresh tropical salad, infused with the flavors of macadamias. Also, planning a special trip this winter has us craving macadamia nuts ;) That's right! We're headed to Hawaii! My sister-in-law is getting married in Maui, so we're flying out for a week and a half, exploring Honolulu and Kauai while we're there. Would love any recommendations you have. I went once in 9th grade with family, but there are a lot of beautiful places I remember, but can't quite figure out what island it was on.

The one thing we do have planned? A Jurassic Park helicopter tour on Kauai. I have an abnormal obsession with Jurassic Park and when I say obsessed, I'm not exaggerating. If any of the movies come on TV, I will drop everything to watch it. Whenever a new Jurassic World trailer comes out, I watch it three times in a row then probably once a week after that. Confession: I just watched it again while inserting that link. I'm even trying to choose an ironic T-Rex shirt to wear on opening night. Someone please help me decide...I want them all!

So yeah, besides the wedding, that will be the highlight of my trip. I was really disappointed when my mom wouldn't let us take one the last time we were there...but she buys me macadamia nut oil, so I suppose that compensates?

Anyway, off my lengthy tangent and on to macadamia nut oil. You could certainly swap extra-virgin olive oil in this recipe, but if you see some macadamia oil, I suggest picking up a bottle. It has a light buttery taste, with enough macadamia flavor to shine through other ingredients, but not overpowering. Macadamia nut oil has one of the healthiest fatty acid profiles. Most of the fats are monounsaturated, the hearth healthy fat found in extra-virgin olive oil. In fact, it contains even more than olive oil. The rest of the fatty acids are mostly saturated, but the specific saturated fatty acids that aren't harmful to heart health, and may even be beneficial. It also has a high smoke point, so it doesn't oxidize in high heat cooking, making it perfect for searing the cubes of tofu in the recipe. Bonus points - I've also read it's great for skin and hair care.

Tropical Salad with Spicy Mango Macadamia Dressing

If you don't have macadamia nut oil, swap extra-virgin olive oil for the dressing and coconut oil for the tofu.

Ingredients

  • 1 package of extra-firm tofu, pressed to remove extra liquid

  • 1 teaspoon lemon pepper seasoning

  • 1 tablespoon macadamia nut oil

  • 1 head leaf lettuce, chopped and washed

  • 1 red bell pepper, stemmed, seeded and diced

  • 1 small jicama, peeled and diced

  • 1 avocado, diced

  • 1/4 cup toasted macadamia nuts, roughly chopped

  • Fresh mint, cilantro and/or basil, for garnish

Dressing:

  • 1 mango, peeled and cubed

  • 2 tablespoons macadamia nut oil

  • 2 tablespoons lime juice

  • 2 pinches cayenne

Instructions

  1. First, make the dressing. Blend all dressing ingredients together in a food processor until creamy and pureed. Season with salt to taste.

  2. Heat macadamia nut oil in a medium skillet on medium-high heat. Cut the tofu into 1-inch cubes and season with lemon pepper seasoning. Add to skillet and fry, tossing every so often, until golden on all sides. Remove from skillet and set aside to cool.

  3. Toss lettuce, jicama, red pepper and avocado together in a large bowl. Add tofu and macadamia nuts. Toss together with mango dressing and serve garnished with fresh herbs.

Vegetable and Soba Noodle Stir Fry with Peanut Sauce

Vegetable and Soba Noodle Stir Fry with Peanut Sauce

This vegetable and soba noodle stir fry is made with chewy, buckwheat soba noodles made from sweet potato and buckwheat. It's packed with veggies - strips of eggplant, green beans, bok choy, and red bell peppers, as well and stir fried tofu and drenched in a spicy peanut sauce!

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Cauliflower Rice and Tofu Bowl with Sriracha-Lime Sauce

Cauliflower Rice and Tofu Bowl with Sriracha-Lime Sauce

You’ll love the spicy sauce in this sriracha-lime tofu cauliflower rice bowl! The sauce gets soaked up by a bed of garlicky cauliflower rice! This easy dinner takes no time at all with pre-riced cauliflower. Packed with protein, veggies and filling fats! Just add brown rice or quinoa to the cauliflower rice for more carbohydrate!

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Tofu and Cauliflower Scramble with Spinach

Cook tofu with a little bit of turmeric and you'll never know it's not eggs! Try my vegan hack in this Indian tofu and cauliflower scramble with spinach. 

Consider this post a big hug for whoever invented the concept of breakfast for dinner.  Without them, I would have starved this week. At the risk of sounding like a broken record, this week has been crazy! At least it's been all fun stuff - evening yoga classes, private practice appointments, pumpkin carving parties, and shopping with friends. Still, I haven't had much time to spend in the kitchen, so most our dinners have been some combination of eggs, potatoes, leftover vegetables and avocado. Throw in some salsa, fresh herbs and feta cheese and you've got yourself a fancy schmancy (and mighty tasty) meal.

Tofu scrambles are a fun little vegan take on scrambled eggs.  I started making tofu scrambles after discovering them at a vegan cafe in California. Tofu has a similar texture to eggs and when you add garlic, onions and other aromatics, it tastes quite similar too. A pinch of turmeric and you can't even tell the difference!

Speaking of turmeric, if it's not on regular rotation in your kitchen, it needs to be. Turmeric is a bright yellow spice with a light flavor reminiscent of ginger.  Studies examining the health benefits of turmeric and it's main active compound, cucurmin, have shown a multitude of benefits.

  • Turmeric may reduce blood glucose
  • India has a dramatically lower rate of Alzheimer disease and turmeric heavy curries might be the reason why. Turmeric is incredibly beneficial for brain health, reducing the formation of the type of plaque found in the brains of Alzheimer's patients
  • Due to it's anti-inflammatory effects, tumeric has been researched as a treatment for both rheumatiod arthritis and osteoarthritis.
  • In lab studies, cucumin has been shown to kill cancer cells.  Evidence for an anticancer benefit is especially strong for breast cancer and melanoma.
  • There are few medical treatments for liver disease, so the fact that turmeric may prevent liver scarring in chronic liver disease is especially exciting.
  • The production of heterocyclic amines, a cancer causing compound formed by cooking foods at high temperatures, may be inhibited by turmeric.

If you've never cooked with turmeric before, there are many ways to incorporate it into your diet. It is commonly used in Indian cuisine, so curry is a good start. You could also sneak turmeric into smoothies or use it to make tea.  I often cook brown basmati rice with turmeric to for a pretty yellow color or stir a few pinches into scrambled eggs or sauteed potatoes and onions. However you use it, make sure your meal has a little fat and black pepper in it, which helps your body absorb all the good stuff!

Tofu and Cauliflower Scramble with Spinach

serves 4

Adapted from Food & Wine Magazine

Ingredients

  • 1 lb firm tofu, drained
  • 1 tablespoon canola oil
  • 1/2 head cauliflower, cut into small florets
  • 2 garlic cloves minced
  • 1 tablespoon finely grated fresh ginger
  • 3/4 teaspoon ground cumin
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground coriander
  • 1/2 teaspoon tumeric
  • 1 bunch of spinach
  • 2 scallions, thinly sliced
  • Salt and black pepper to taste
  • 100% whole grain naan or pita, warmed
  • Harissa or sriracha

Instructions

  1. Wrap the tofu with a clean dishtowel or paper towels, place on a plate and cover with a heavy skillet or can. Let sit for 30-60 minutes to drain, then crumble.
  2. Heat oil in a large skillet on medium heat. Add cauliflower and cook, stirring occasionally, until starting to brown, about 6 minutes. Add tofu and and cook until both cauliflower and tofu are browned, another 6 minutes, stirring occasionally. Add garlic and ginger and cook about 30 seconds, then add cumin, coriander and tumeric and cook another 30 seconds. Season with salt and pepper to taste. Stir in spinach and scallions and cook until wilted, about 2-3 minutes.
  3. Serve with naan and harissa or sriracha.

Easy Jerk Tofu Bowl with Garlicky Collards

Easy Jerk Tofu Bowl with Garlicky Collards

This easy jerk tofu bowl with garlicky collards is an explosion of flavor! Pile brown rice with garlicky sauteed collards, sliced avocado and crispy baked jerk tofu! This vegetarian bowl recipe is easy, quick, and will definitely satisfy your taste buds. Less than 10 ingredients!

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